Every State’s Travel Guide for Residents and Visitors



Slide 1 of 51: Most U.S. states imposed limitations on interstate and international travel shortly after the coronavirus began to spread across the country in the beginning of February. Five months later, with most of the country open to some extent, many travel bans and requirements are also being lifted. Some states, however, are imposing new restrictions due to a surge of new COVID-19 cases. 24/7 Tempo reviewed executive orders from state governors, travel advisories, and guidelines from public health and tourism departments to find and list travel restrictions that are still in place in every state. Nationwide, travelers coming from Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the United Kingdom, and countries from the European Schengen Area are not allowed to enter the United States based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention travel advisories. On a state level, only Hawaii has a measure in place that prohibits visitors who refuse to quarantine for 14 days from leaving the airport. People can still plan summer vacations and road trips, though travelers have to be cautious, wear masks, avoid crowds, and practice good hygiene. States are slowly welcoming back visitors as the majority of popular attractions in the country are reopening -- these are the most beautiful attractions in the U.S.
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Slide 51 of 51: ></p><p>Most U.S. states imposed limitations on interstate and international travel shortly after the coronavirus began to spread across the country in the beginning of February. Five months later, with most of the country open to some extent, many travel bans and requirements are also being lifted. Some states, however, are imposing new restrictions due to a surge of new COVID-19 cases.</p><p>24/7 Tempo reviewed executive orders from state governors, travel advisories, and guidelines from public health and tourism departments to find and list travel restrictions that are still in place in every state.</p><div class='code-block code-block-21 ai-viewport-3' style='margin: 8px auto; text-align: center; display: block; clear: both;'> <a href=

Nationwide, travelers coming from Brazil, China, Iran, Ireland, the United Kingdom, and countries from the European Schengen Area are not allowed to enter the United States based on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention travel advisories. On a state level, only Hawaii has a measure in place that prohibits visitors who refuse to quarantine for 14 days from leaving the airport.

People can still plan summer vacations and road trips, though travelers have to be cautious, wear masks, avoid crowds, and practice good hygiene. States are slowly welcoming back visitors as the majority of popular attractions in the country are reopening — these are the most beautiful attractions in the U.S.

Alabama

> Population: 4.9 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 80,309 (19th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,643 (9th most)

There are no travel restrictions for residents and visitors when traveling in Alabama. Beaches are open for everyone with no limit on group sizes as long as people practice physical distancing of at least 6 feet. Tourist attractions, entertainment venues, and restaurants are open but at limited capacity and offer varying levels of service. People must wear masks in public.

Alaska

> Population: 737,000
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 2,622 (4th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 356 (6th fewest)

Anyone who is entering Alaska — whether from another state or country — has to complete a Travel Declaration Form explaining his or her test history and show proof of a negative COVID-19 test taken within the last three days. Another option is to get tested in Alaska upon arrival and self-quarantine until results are available. A third option is to self-quarantine for 14 days before being able to travel freely in the state.

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Arizona

> Population: 7.2 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 165,934 (8th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 2,314 (2nd most)

As of July 28, Arizona had no restrictions on visitors. People traveling through Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport must wear masks. Visitors are asked to stay out of the Navajo Nation to prevent further spread of the virus. All tourism locations, tribal parks, and casinos in Navajo Nation are closed.

Arkansas

> Population: 3.0 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 39,447 (21st fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,309 (19th most)

Restrictions on travelers entering Alaska have been lifted since June 15. There is no requirement to self-quarantine for any visitors, whether they come from other parts of the country or abroad. Hotels, motels, and other lodgings are no longer restricted to hosting essential workers only. There is a statewide mandate for wearing masks when outside.

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California

> Population: 39.6 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 460,550 (the most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,164 (23rd most)

As of July 28, travel restrictions have loosened in California and visitors are not required to self-quarantine. Though theme parks are still closed, beaches, national parks, RV parks, campgrounds, and other recreational facilities are open. Some of these locations are operating at limited capacity. Travelers landing at public airports may be asked to quarantine. People are required to wear face masks in indoor public spaces, except when eating or drinking at a restaurant.

Colorado

> Population: 5.7 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 44,565 (25th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 782 (14th fewest)

Though there are no travel restrictions for visitors entering Colorado as of July 28, people are asked to practice responsible tourism. Travelers must wear masks or other types of face covering when in public and near other people, keep 6 feet distance, and practice good hygiene.

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Connecticut

> Population: 3.6 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 48,983 (25th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,371 (16th most)

Because of a resurgence in COVID-19 infections in Connecticut, the state is requiring that travelers from states with a new daily positive test rate higher than 10 per 100,000 residents self-quarantine for two weeks. As of July 28, those states are: Alaska, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin. Failure to self-quarantine may result in a fine of $1,000.

Delaware

> Population: 967,000
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 14,406 (11th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,489 (12th most)

People are required to wear masks when they are in public places, including outside. Physical distance of at least 6 feet is also required unless people are from the same household. Residents returning to Delaware from anywhere else are encouraged to get tested and self-quarantine until results are ready.

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Florida

> Population: 21.3 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 441,977 (2nd most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 2,075 (4th most)

Visitors from states with high infection rates are required to self-quarantine for 14 days or for the duration of their visit, whichever is shorter. Health screenings at airports and at roadside checkpoints are still set up. Face-covering requirements vary by county, though people are encouraged to always have a mask on when in public. With the number of coronavirus cases and hospitalizations spiking in some parts of Florida, the mayor of Miami-Dade County has ordered on July 6 all short-term vacation rentals in the county closed.

Georgia

> Population: 10.5 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 170,843 (7th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,624 (10th most)

As of July 28, there are no state travel restrictions for people visiting Georgia. Visitors are encouraged to practice basic hygiene, such as washing hands often, avoiding close contact with people outside their household, wearing a face covering, and practicing social distancing.

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Hawaii

> Population: 1.4 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 1,711 (2nd fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 120 (the fewest)

A mandatory 14-day self-quarantine for all visitors, including returning residents, remains in place until August 31. Violators face a fine of up to $5,000. Further, visitors who refuse to be quarantined will be forced to return home immediately without leaving the airport.

Starting September 1, visitors who present a negative COVID-19 test — taken no more than 72 days before boarding a flight to Hawaii — will not have to quarantine for 14 days. Travelers who have chosen not to get pre-tested are required to self-quarantine. No coronavirus tests will be provided at airports.

Idaho

> Population: 1.8 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 18,694 (13th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,066 (25th most)

Idaho, except Ada County, which includes Boise, is in phase 4 of reopening and currently there are no travel restrictions. Out-of-state visitors are no longer required, but are encouraged, to self-quarantine for two weeks. Visitors are asked to maintain a physical distance of at least 6 feet from others, wash their hands often, and wear face coverings when social distancing is not feasible.

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Illinois

> Population: 12.7 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 173,731 (6th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,364 (17th most)

As of July 28, there were no travel restrictions for people arriving from other U.S. states. Visitors from countries with widespread, ongoing transmission have to self-quarantine for 14 days. There is a statewide face-covering mandate.

People visiting or returning to Chicago from Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Utah are required to self-quarantine for 14 days from their last contact with those states. Violators face fines of up to $500 per day, up to a maximum of $7,000.

Indiana

> Population: 6.7 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 63,678 (20th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 952 (23rd fewest)

As of July 28, there were no statewide travel restrictions to or from Indiana. However, Indiana’s travel restrictions are enforced on a county basis. There are eight counties on either advisories or watches, meaning travel or activities may be restricted in certain situations.

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Iowa

> Population: 3.2 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 42,738 (22nd fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,354 (18th most)

Iowa has not issued statewide travel restrictions as of July 28, though residents returning from out of state are strongly encouraged to self-quarantine for 14 days. Visitors are asked to follow CDC public health guidelines.

Kansas

> Population: 2.9 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 26,172 (17th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 899 (20th fewest)

People traveling from states with widespread transmission have to self-quarantine for 14 days. As of July 28, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment has identified two such states: Arizona and Florida. Travelers who have been on cruise or river ships, as well those arriving from abroad, also have to self-quarantine. The mandate does not apply to infrastructure sectors. There is a statewide face-covering mandate.

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Kentucky

> Population: 4.5 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 27,601 (18th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 618 (10th fewest)

Kentucky’s interstate travel ban expired on May 22. However, travelers who are visiting from states or territories with a positivity rate of nearly 15% or higher are asked to self-quarantine for two weeks. As of July 28, there are seven states above the threshold: Mississippi, Arizona, Florida, Alabama, Idaho, Kansas, and South Carolina.

Louisiana

> Population: 4.7 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 111,038 (11th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 2,383 (the most)

As of July 28, Louisiana has not issued any travel restrictions. However, the state’s Department of Health has a list of considerations and guidance for travelers, including delaying travel plans and avoiding cruises. There is a statewide mask mandate.

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Maine

> Population: 1.3 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 3,838 (6th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 287 (3rd fewest)

Maine requires people entering the state to self-quarantine for 14 days or present a negative COVID-19 test that is not older than three days. The mandate does not apply to residents of Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, New Hampshire, or Vermont. Maine residents who go out of state to a state that is not on the exempt list must also self-quarantine when they return or test negative for the virus.

Maryland

> Population: 6.0 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 85,524 (16th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,415 (15th most)

As of July 28, there were no statewide travel restrictions or requirements. However, people traveling out of the state for nonessential activities are encouraged to self-quarantine for two weeks upon returning to Maryland. Tourists are advised to contact businesses before arriving to make sure they are open.

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Massachusetts

> Population: 6.9 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 115,926 (10th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,680 (8th most)

Massachusetts requires that all travelers, including residents returning to the state, self-quarantine for 14 days. People arriving from Rhode Island, Connecticut, Vermont, New Hampshire, Maine, New York, and New Jersey are exempt from this mandate. Essential critical infrastructure workers are also exempt if they come to Massachusetts for work purposes.

After Aug. 1, all travelers and returning residents must submit an online form and self-quarantine for 14 days, unless they are arriving from low-risk states, which, as of July 28, are Connecticut, Hawaii, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Travelers who show a negative result, no more than three days old, don’t have to quarantine. Violators face a fine of up to $500 per day.

Michigan

> Population: 10.0 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 87,173 (14th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 872 (19th fewest)

While Michigan has no statewide travel restrictions as of July 28, the military is barring service men and women from traveling to and from the state due to a recent increase in new coronavirus cases. A statewide face mask mandate is in effect.

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Minnesota

> Population: 5.6 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 52,281 (23rd most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 932 (22nd fewest)

Although it does not have any specific travel restrictions to residents or out-of-state visitors, Minnesota has encouraged travelers to “seek expert guidance and take routine precautions as outlined by the CDC” to make informed decisions. Face coverings are required in all indoor businesses and public indoor spaces.

Mississippi

> Population: 3.0 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 52,957 (22nd most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,773 (6th most)

As of July 28, Mississippi has not issued any travel restrictions. Residents and visitors are strongly encouraged to wear masks or other face coverings when in public and to stay at least 6 feet away from other people. Residents are advised to avoid nonessential business travel.

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Missouri

> Population: 6.1 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 43,045 (23rd fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 703 (11th fewest)

The state has not issued any travel restrictions. Although there is no statewide face-covering mandate, masks are required in a few areas, including Clay County, Columbia, Jackson County, Johnson County, Joplin, Kansas City, North Kansas City, Springfield, and St. Louis.

Montana

> Population: 1.1 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 3,475 (5th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 327 (4th fewest)

Montana lifted the 14-day quarantine requirement for out-of-state visitors on June 1. Health screenings in airports and train depots will continue. All travelers are encouraged to maintain social distance and clean objects and surfaces they touch.

Glacier National Park has opened only the west entrance. The Blackfeet Nation is keeping the park’s eastern entrances closed at least until the end of August as they are on tribal land.

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Nebraska

> Population: 1.9 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 24,899 (16th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,291 (20th most)

Nebraska’s Department of Health and Human Services recommends that residents quarantine for 14 days after returning from international travel. It also recommends that visitors self-quarantine for 14 days or the duration of their stay if they are staying less than two weeks.

Nevada

> Population: 3.0 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 43,831 (24th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,444 (13th most)

Nevada has placed no travel restrictions on residents or visitors but it strongly discourages people who have COVID-19 and have not yet recovered — whether they have been tested or presumptively diagnosed — from traveling to the state. Physical distancing of at least 6 feet is highly recommended. There is a statewide face-covering mandate for public places.

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New Hampshire

> Population: 1.4 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 6,441 (9th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 475 (9th fewest)

New Hampshire officials are encouraging visitors to remain in their home states. Those who are traveling to New Hampshire for an extended period of time are asked to self-quarantine for 14 days. The quarantine requirement has been lifted for people who travel to New Hampshire from Maine, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, or Rhode Island.

New Jersey

> Population: 8.9 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 180,295 (5th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 2,024 (5th most)

Travelers arriving in New Jersey by any method of transportation from a state with a high infection rate (10% or more), which is based on a seven-day average number of new COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents, are required to quarantine for two weeks. As of July 28, these states are: Alaska, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

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New Mexico

> Population: 2.1 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 19,502 (15th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 931 (21st fewest)

New Mexico recently tightened the statewide travel restrictions in response to a resurgence of new COVID-19 cases in the state. All out-of-state visitors and residents returning to New Mexico by plane or car must self-quarantine for 14 days. Essential workers are exempt from the public order. Face coverings are mandatory for all travelers and residents.

New York

> Population: 19.5 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 412,878 (3rd most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 2,113 (3rd most)

Everyone over the age of 2 is required to wear a face covering when in public, as long as they can medically tolerate it. A travel advisory requires visitors from states with a high infection rate to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival. As of July 28, there were 31 states with a positive test rate of 10% or higher (the tri-state area high infection rate criteria) — Alaska, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Missouri, Mississippi, Montana, North Carolina, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Mexico, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

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North Carolina

> Population: 10.4 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 116,087 (9th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,118 (24th most)

North Carolina has no statewide travel restrictions. Some destinations, including state parks and forests, have various restrictions, and travelers are advised to check with each place before arriving. All travelers and residents are required to wear face coverings when in public, both inside and outside.

North Dakota

> Population: 760,000
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 6,141 (8th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 808 (15th fewest)

Those who arrive in North Dakota from another country, or who traveled internationally in the past 14 days, are required to quarantine for two weeks, or until they have been in the United States for two weeks, whichever duration is shorter.

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Ohio

> Population: 11.7 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 85,177 (17th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 729 (13th fewest)

Residents and visitors who have been to an area of high risk are asked to self-quarantine for 14 days. As of July 28, Ohio has identified nine states as high risk: Arizona, Nevada, Florida, Idaho, Alabama, Mississippi, South Carolina, Georgia, and Texas.

Oklahoma

> Population: 3.9 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 33,775 (19th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 857 (18th fewest)

Oklahoma recommends that people avoid nonessential travel, especially if they are at higher risk of illness or feeling unwell. Officials also recommend that people postpone international travel or any type of cruise. Anyone returning from a country that has had travel restrictions imposed should quarantine for 14 days after returning.

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Oregon

> Population: 4.2 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 17,088 (12th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 408 (7th fewest)

Though nonessential travel is still limited, there are no statewide bans for residents or out-of-state travelers. Visitors are asked to practice social distancing, wash hands frequently, and avoid public places if they have a fever or cough. Face coverings are mandatory for indoor public places and for outdoors when maintaining physical distance is difficult.

Pennsylvania

> Population: 12.8 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 109,384 (12th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 854 (17th fewest)

Masks are required in all public places in Pennsylvania. As of July 28, there were no statewide travel restrictions for residents or visitors. However, the state asks that travelers who have visited an area with a recent coronavirus surge voluntarily self-quarantine for two weeks. The affected states are Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Nevada, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, and Wyoming.

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Rhode Island

> Population: 1.1 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 18,725 (14th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,771 (7th most)

Out-of-state visitors as well as residents returning to Rhode Island from a state with a positive test rate of 5% or higher have to either quarantine for 14 days or present a negative test result for COVID-19 that is not older than 72 hours prior to their arrival in Rhode Island. As of July 28, these states were Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Idaho, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, North Carolina, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Viriginia, Washington, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. The mandate applies to people coming from Puerto Rico as well. Face coverings are mandatory when people are in public.

South Carolina

> Population: 5.1 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 82,417 (18th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,621 (11th most)

People returning to or visiting South Carolina from a place outside the state, whether in the United States or abroad, with widespread community spread should self-quarantine for 14 days. Tourists from New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, and New Orleans no longer have to self-quarantine. People who have been on a cruise are also advised to stay home for at least two weeks.

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South Dakota

> Population: 882,000
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 8,492 (10th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 963 (24th fewest)

As of July 28, South Dakota had no travel restrictions for visitors or residents. However, the state’s Department of Tourism points out that some routes through tribal lands may be closed and tourists should check before traveling.

Tennessee

> Population: 6.8 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 96,489 (13th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,425 (14th most)

As of July 28, there were no travel restrictions in Tennessee.

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Texas

> Population: 28.7 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 369,826 (4th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,289 (21st most)

All air travel restrictions related to the COVID-19 pandemic in Texas have been lifted. Quarantine requirements for out-of-state visitors, including those from former hotspots like New York and New Jersey, have also been lifted.

Utah

> Population: 3.2 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 38,409 (20th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,215 (22nd most)

Utah encourages travelers to reconsider nonessential travel to places with high infection rates. There are no restrictions on traveling to, from, and through the state, but people are advised to maintain social distancing and wear masks indoors.

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Vermont

> Population: 626,000
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 1,405 (the fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 224 (2nd fewest)

Anyone who lives in a county with fewer than 400 cases per million residents can travel to Vermont without having to self-quarantine for any period of time. Out-of-state residents coming from states with higher rates of infection have to either self-quarantine or show a negative test. As of July 28, affected counties are in Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, West Virginia, and Ohio.

Virginia

> Population: 8.5 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 86,994 (15th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 1,021 (25th fewest)

Virginia lifted its restrictions on out-of-state travelers from areas with high rates of community spread within the U.S. Previously, these travelers had to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arrival in the state. The quarantine recommendation remains in effect, however, for international visitors and people who are coming back from a cruise or river boat. People are required to wear face coverings when they are outside in public.

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Washington

> Population: 7.5 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 53,321 (21st most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 708 (12th fewest)

Washington state currently has no domestic travel bans, but officials have several options for enforcing quarantines if they deem a person could “create a risk of serious harm.” Health officials can request a voluntary quarantine, and those officials or a court can issue an order for involuntary quarantine. There is a statewide face-covering mandate in effect.

West Virginia

> Population: 1.8 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 6,119 (7th fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 339 (5th fewest)

There were no statewide travel restrictions in the state as of July 28. West Virginia’s Bureau for Public Health recommends that people visiting or returning to the state from a large or crowded vacation area self-quarantine for 14 days.

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Wisconsin

> Population: 5.8 million
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 49,417 (24th most)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 850 (16th fewest)

The Wisconsin Department of Health Services recommends that residents avoid traveling outside of their communities, even if it is within the state. Still, those who have to travel are advised to check for area-specific closures and restrictions, as some may require self-quarantine for 14 days. Nonessential travel abroad, including on cruises, is strongly discouraged.

Wyoming

> Population: 578,000
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases as of July 28: 2,520 (3rd fewest)
> Cumulative COVID-19 cases per 100,000 people: 436 (8th fewest)

Out-of-state travelers no longer have to self-quarantine for 14 days upon arriving in Wyoming. There were no travel restrictions as of July 28, though visitors are advised to check in with businesses and events before traveling as some are open with restrictions or closed.

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